Myth: Bigfoot Hunters (2021) Review

Myth Bigfoot Hunters Art

Myth: Bigfoot Hunters begins with Jack Taggard (Jack Rooney) waking up, having breakfast and driving to work. He’ll soon wish his alarm hadn’t gone off, but not as much as the audience will.

Jack was a soldier, now he’s a park ranger, but that’s about to change. General Travis (David Briggs) is waiting for him at the station. Two of the Army’s best men have gone missing in the woods. The military has taken control of the park and he and his partner Shikoba (Alex Marshall, Night of the Unspeakable) are ordered to lead the search and rescue team. That consists of them, Topper (W.E. Walker Jr.), Billy (Jake Amrhein) and military spook Devin (Hauke Bahr, The Art of Self-Defense).

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At only an hour-long I figured Myth: Bigfoot Hunters would make a good quick watch. The acting was my first clue that I guessed wrong. This is the only credit for much of the cast which makes me think writer/director Brando Snider, who also has no other credits, decided to make a movie and recruited some friends to star in it. The one talented performer in the film, Cindy Maples (Morbid Colors, 10/31) shows up as Jack’s wife who also went missing in the forest.

Even worse, for the first twenty minutes of the film, nothing happens to divert your attention from the acting. There’s so much footage of people walking through the woods Myth: Bigfoot Hunters began to resemble one of the less interesting Bigfoot documentaries.

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Then they find an intestine sitting in a small pool of blood, which is passed off as a man whose been torn apart. I’d have expected a lot more blood even if they couldn’t afford to show the body. What we do see of Bigfoot looks decent enough, covered in long, coarse silver-grey fur. We never see its face though.

The plot eventually draws in a missing EPA agent named Bailey Travis (Alexa Raye, Lakota Girls), military experiments that involve giving animals STDs, a Native shaman (Lloyd Hyderkhan) and the remains of a mysterious building which, despite supposedly being deep in the woods has a paved road clearly visible behind it. By the end, so little was explained and there were so many things left hanging that, along with its hour-long running time, Myth: Bigfoot Hunters feels like it was intended to be the first episode of a YouTube series.

Myth: Bigfoot Hunters is available on several digital platforms via Green Apple Entertainment. I saw it on Tubi, and if it’s available in your country that would be your second best choice. Your best choice would be not to bother.

Our Score

Jim Morazzini

Movie buff, gym rat and crazy cat guy

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